Video: Creating Healthy Home Environments for Kids: Top 5 Tips

Great new video and resources from the Canadian Partnership for Children’s Health and Environment (CPCHE). While it isn’t made for people with MCS/ES, following their advice will make the world a safer place for us all.  It should also help convince friends and family that the accommodations we need and have been asking for are good for everyone, especially children.

“Controlling house dust; switching to less-toxic, fragrance-free cleaners; taking extreme care with renovation projects; avoiding certain types and uses of plastics; and choosing fish that are low in mercury are the five priority actions recommended by the Canadian Partnership for Children’s Health and Environment (CPCHE).”

“The 12-minute video – available in English and French and complemented by supporting print resources – is designed to be a “turn-key” solution for prenatal educators and other service providers looking for ways to address growing concerns about toxic substances and associated health risks for children.”

See  www.healthyenvironmentforkids.ca for all their helpful resources, including a brochure that goes with this video.

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2 responses to “Video: Creating Healthy Home Environments for Kids: Top 5 Tips

  1. The New York Times has a new article with some other great resources, if you can get past the tone the article was written in: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/15/garden/going-to-extreme-lengths-to-purge-household-toxins.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

  2. And more research indicating how important it is to control exposures to toxic chemicals in our everyday environments:

    Toxic environmental chemicals: the role of reproductive health professionals in preventing harmful exposures

    http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378%2812%2900065-8/abstract

    “Every pregnant woman in the United States is exposed to many and varied environmental chemicals. Rapidly accumulating scientific evidence documents that widespread exposure to environmental chemicals at levels that are encountered in daily life can impact reproductive and developmental health adversely. Preconception and prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals are of particular importance because they may have a profound and lasting impact on health across the life course. Thus, prevention of developmental exposures to environmental chemicals would benefit greatly from the active participation of reproductive health professionals in clinical and policy arenas.”

    An article about this research is here: http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2012/03/11667/ob-gyns-can-prevent-negative-health-impacts-environmental-chemicals

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