The CDC and MCS

There have been questions about whether or not the CDC (Center for Disease Control) recognizes MCS.

Their Indoor Environmental Quality Policy from 2009 explicitly states:

Fragrance is not appropriate for a professional work environment, and the use of some products with fragrance may be detrimental to the health of workers with chemical sensitivities, allergies, asthma, and chronic headaches/migraines.”

Here are a few more excerpts:

INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY POLICY

o
… This policy establishes guidance and procedures to protect and maintain safe indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and guidelines for reporting and investigating complaints. This policy applies to all CDC1 workers (employees, contractors, guest researchers, etc.) at all CDC facilities, both leased and owned, and all CDC work areas including animal facilities.

C. Building Occupants

It is important that personnel be aware that the use of some personal care products may have detrimental effects on the health of chemically sensitive co-workers. Personal care products (colognes, perfumes, essential oils and scented skin and hair products) should not be brought into, used, or otherwise applied at or near actual workstations, in restrooms, or anywhere in CDC facilities.

Indoor Environmental Quality Hazard: Building condition that has the potential to adversely impact the health of building occupants.

Potential hazards include chemicals, biological agents, fragrant products, and physical conditions that may cause irritation, illness, or exacerbate existing health conditions.

1.    Non-Permissible Products

Scented or fragranced products are prohibited at all times in all interior space owned, rented, or leased by CDC. This includes the use of:

• Incense, candles, or reed diffusers

• Fragrance-emitting devices of any kind

• Wall-mounted devices, similar to fragrance-emitting devices, that operate automatically or by pushing a button to dispense deodorizers or disinfectants

• Potpourri

• Plug-in or spray air fresheners

• Urinal or toilet blocks

• Other fragranced deodorizer/re-odorizer products

Personal care products (e.g. colognes, perfumes, essential oils, scented skin and hair products) should not be applied at or near actual workstations, restrooms, or anywhere in CDC owned or leased buildings.

In addition, CDC encourages employees to be as fragrance-free as possible when they arrive in the workplace. Fragrance is not appropriate for a professional work environment, and the use of some products with fragrance may be detrimental to the health of workers with chemical sensitivities, allergies, asthma, and chronic headaches/migraines.

Employees should avoid using scented detergents and fabric softeners on clothes worn to the office. Many fragrance-free personal care and laundry products are easily available and provide safer alternatives.

A copy of the whole policy, where they also discuss safer cleaning, pest control, repairs and renovations can be downloaded here:

http://www.drsteinemann.com/Resources/CDC%20Indoor%20Environmental%20Quality%20Policy.pdf

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s